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Showing posts from August, 2016

I went to a Parkrun

I've been running for a couple of years. I woke up a week after my 35th birthday and had the motivating realisation of quite how out of shape I was and that this would only get worse if I didn't do something about it. I worked my way up to 5km and then to 10km, running 4-5 times a week over the first three months and maintained a habit of doing 2-3 10km runs a week since.

We've moved to Beeston and I decided to join a running club and start doing the Beeston Parkrun five weeks ago. Running with others is still very new for me. To be honest, the idea of a running club and timed running had intimidated me before, but I'm enjoying it and haven't felt any of the pressure I imagined might be the case.

Some observations...
1. I'm reasonably fit but way behind some. I'm averaging a top 60 finish out of 180-220 people which feels good. PB currently 24:37. 2. Running with others makes you run faster as they pull you along, or it destroys you in your head as you see…

Psalm 2: The Word of His Wrath

The British Government responded harshly to Guy Fawkes conspiracy. Hung for his crime. And remembered for his conspiracy even 411 years later.

What of the human conspiracy to dethrone God?

Psalm 2v4 – heaven laughs 
And – the LORD scoffs 

On the one hand, it’s laughable and futile… heaven says “as if…”
The crowds mocked Jesus in his crucifixion, and mockery means what the next verses says:

Psalm 2v5 – he rebukes in anger 
And – he terrifies in wrath Heaven’s anger is stirred. 

What is the terrifying word of God's wrath?

Heaven speaks. ‘I have installed my king on… my holy mountain’ 
The true king is the Lord Jesus, the LORD’s Anointed one.
When is he lifted up? Where is he crowned? At the cross.

 God’s word of wrath against human sin is the cross of the true king. Not immediate judgement on the world… Not to hang, draw and quarter us… No. To put forth the true king to bear the wrath stirred by human sin. To offer himself in our place.

 It’s unimaginable that King James would’v…

Psalm 2: My name is John Johnson

In the early hours of Saturday 5th November 1605 a man claiming to be John Johnson left a cellar underneath the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, and was promptly arrested. Inside were found many barrels of gunpowder. So ended an 18 month conspiracy led by Robert Catesby and involving the arrested man – not called John Johnson but Guido Fawkes.

Catesby, Fawkes and co had sought to kill King James and replace him with his daughter Elizabeth. A political move to suit their own purposes. Who will be on the throne? They said; we will choose.

Three thousand year old song, Psalm 2 describes a similar kind of conspiracy on an altogether grander global political scale. In v1-3 the kings of the earth plot together.

1. Who is the conspiracy against? 
V2 The LORD and his Anointed 

 That is to say, the Father and his Christ. We do sin against one another but Psalms tell us that our real problem is with the LORD and his Christ – human beings conspire against God, to overthrow him and place thems…

Who's in and who's out?

Image -  Paul Hiebert via Theodigital
Paul Hiebert's 1978 paper 'Conversion, Culture and Cognitive Categories'poses the question of what's required to say someone is or isn't a Christian. He poses the senario of an illiterate peasant in Indian who professes faith after hearing the Christian gospel once. What would it take to say they're actually a Christian?

This sort of thinking could be applied to other things too - I'm a member of a running club, Suppose there's a person has paid up but never runs... and there's another person who runs with us but hasn't formally joined... who is the club member? So too, political parties etc.

Hiebert looks at the way Christian faith is popularly considered to be a bounded set - with a clear boundary between Christian and not a Christian based on orthodoxy or orthopraxy, where the key task is to get someone over the boundary. There's much good in the model, but Hiebert's question is - what about his new…

Mission as prophetic dialogue

Some interesting observations on Christian mission from Roman Catholic priest Stephan Bevans' paper Mission as prophetic dialogue.Not my general 'go to' for insight, but I enjoy reading widely, learning from the differences, learning from what's good even if sometimes there are bones to spit.

Bevans, with Roger Schrader, begin with God:
That mission is dialogical is rooted in the reality that God... is dialogue. God is not a lonely monad but a communion of persons, distinct from one another and yet one in identity and purpose... This communion of giving and receiving Love overflows into the entire cosmos that God created out of sheer grace, and calls it into communion with Godself. This is what we mean by God’s mission, the Missio Dei. Union with Christ brings us into the life of God.
Through Baptism, Christians share the very life and of the Trinity, and so they are enjoined to carry out God’s mission in the same dialogical way. Concretely, this means that Christians…